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STATESMAN OPINION: WE WANT TO SEE MORE FROM KOFI ADDAH

General News

There are still refuse heaps scattered all over the country, with market places where food and meat are sold for human consumption not even spared.

There are still refuse heaps scattered all over the country, with market places where food and meat are sold for human consumption not even spared.

 

Apart from the serious health implications associated with this practice, the picture it sends out to the international world about Ghana, the black star of Africa, is very bad and has the tendency to affect the tourist potential of the country.

Not long ago, President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo boldly declared his commitment to ensure that Accra becomes the neatest city in Africa under his tenure.

This was followed by the launch of the National Sanitation Campaign, with a call on all Ghanaians to treat every day as sanitation day.  

However, this does not seem to be the case as we see on daily basis the littering of our environment through the dumping of all kinds of materials ranging from paper to plastic waste.

In as much as the President has vowed to make Accra the neatest, the road to ensuring that this becomes a reality starts with us as individuals. We ought to ensure that that we avoid littering the environment with the notion that “this is just one plastic waste, it won’t do anything.”

It is these little waste that pile up which is a blot on the landscape.

The fact of the matter is that not all disasters can be controlled but we, through our activities, invite these disasters on ourselves through   our disregard for environmental issues.

Since 2014, the first Saturday of every month has been earmarked as National Sanitation Day, where Ghanaians are expected to clean their communities. But this has not been worth it, with piles of rubbish spotted almost in our communities every day.

We believe the President’s vision to ensure that Ghana becomes clean culminated in his wise decision to have a whole ministry dedicated to sanitation.

But as stated earlier, despite the setting up of the sanitation ministry, we all need to be sanitation ambassadors every day and everywhere we find ourselves.

But we want to repeat our call on the sector minister to be more proactive in tackling the sanitation problems in the country.

Ghanaians don’t seem to have seen much of his ministry and it is about time he justified the creation of the ministry and his subsequent appointment. Simply put, we all want to see more action in tackling the sanitation problems of the country.